U-GRO Learning Centres

15 Benefits of Reading With Your Child 15 Minutes (Or More!) Each Day

Father and young daughter reading together

Whether your infant is chewing the corners of Baby’s First 100 Words, your toddler is begging you to read The Very Hungry Caterpillar for the third time in a row, or your preschooler is giggling his way through the adventures of Elephant and Piggie, time spent reading with your child each day plays a significant role in his or her development and future educational success.

In fact, reading with your child every day is now doctor-recommended. The American Academy of Pediatrics recognized the importance of early literacy and the benefits of reading aloud to your child from infancy. Your doctor may even begin advocating for daily reading sessions at your child’s check-ups.

We’ve collected 15 benefits that show why reading with your child for 15 minutes every day shouldn’t be ignored:

  1. 90% of a child’s brain is developed in his/her first three years.
  2. By age three, a child’s vocabulary can predict third-grade reading proficiency.
  3. Reading 15 minutes per day exposes children to over 1,000,000 words per year.
  4. A child not reading at grade level by the end of first grade has an 88% chance of not reading at grade level by the end of fourth grade.
  5. Children who are read to frequently are more likely to recognize all the letters of the alphabet, count to 20 or higher, write their own names, and read or pretend to read, than those who were not.
  6. Shared parent-child book reading during a child’s preschool years leads to higher reading achievement in elementary school, as well as greater enthusiasm for reading and learning.
  7. Young children who are regularly read to have a larger vocabulary, higher levels of phonological, letter name, and sound awareness, and better success at decoding words.
  8. Reading fiction improves a person’s (young or old) capacity for empathy and understanding other people’s emotions.
  9. Reading builds a child’s knowledge base, which can boost confidence and self-esteem.
  10. Reading is more neurobiologically demanding than watching TV or listening to the radio. Reading also builds concentration and attention skills.
  11. Interest in reading books outside of school falls from 100% in Kindergarten to 54% in fourth grade. Why? Parents stop reading to their kids around this time.
  12. “Book language” differs from language heard in daily conversation or television and movies. Book language is more descriptive and grammatically correct.
  13. Reading aloud lets parents and teachers model how pleasant, valuable, and exciting books and reading can be and children will catch their enthusiasm.
  14. Children’s books will expose children to 50% more rare words than prime-time television.
  15. Among children 6-8 years old who are read books aloud at home, 68% reported they loved it/like it a lot and 78% of that group said it was a special time spent with their parents.

U-GRO’s Blended Model® curriculum for all ages, from infancy through pre-K, focuses on early literacy components that include singing, storytelling, and read aloud activities. Schedule a visit at a nearby location to see our teachers and students in action!

Sources:
1, 2: http://www.unitedwayhallcounty.org/fullpanel/uploads/files/did-you-know–long.jpg
3: https://thebarefootgigi.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/1009776_601553489890053_24615729_n.jpg
4: http://readaloud.org/highstakes.html
5: http://www.nea.org/grants/facts-about-childrens-literacy.html
6, 7: http://www.childtrends.org/?indicators=reading-to-young-children
8: https://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2013/oct/08/literary-fiction-improves-empathy-study
9, 10: http://www.gemmlearning.com/blog/reading_and_dyslexia/benefits-reading
11: https://nancyann.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/readaloud_infographic12naw1.jpg
12, 13: https://www.naeyc.org/files/yc/file/200303/ReadingAloud.pdf
14: http://www.reachoutandreadsc.org/aloud.html
15: http://www.scholastic.com/readingreport/reading-aloud.htm